MY WEEK IN WESTMINSTER

This week I attended the official opening of the Lytham Windmill and Old Lifeboat House museums.

The newly-refurbished museums are well worth taking the time to pay a visit and are a credit to the volunteers who have put their time and efforts into creating such high-quality attractions.

In the Lifeboat House, a newly-restored historic rescue vessel is a fine centrepiece for the exhibition and a reminder of the types of crafts the RNLI have used over the years, putting their safety on the line to save lives off the Fylde coast. Meanwhile, the exhibition in the windmill focuses on the history of mills and the wider heritage of the Lytham St Annes area.

Together these two museums provide an extremely interesting look back into the area’s history.

I was pleased to see the Business Secretary, the Rt Hon Sajid Javid, this week standing up for workers in the service industries by insisting that tips go to those who have earned them.

Living in Fylde as I do, I know a great many people who work in restaurants, hotels, cafes and bars. They work incredibly hard for their money and are extremely appreciative when that is recognised in the form of a tip.

It is, therefore, unacceptable if the money left by a well-meaning customer goes to the business rather than the intended server. I understand some companies which previously allowed staff to keep tips had been considering introducing service charges as a way to boost profits after the Government increased minimum wages and brought in compulsory pensions for workers.

However, tips are there to reward staff and I support the Government 100 per cent in its plans to prevent this and would back proposals to update the existing voluntary code of practice and put it on a statutory footing to ensure employers comply.

This Thursday I will be back in Fylde for the Lancashire Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) election.

This is an important election as PCCs have real power: they hire and fire chief constables, they control where money is spent on policing and they set the local crime priorities.

People can vote for a candidate who promises the world but delivers unsafe streets and wasted money; someone who cuts local policing and raises taxes. Alternatively, they can vote for someone who will work with the Government to deliver lower crime and safer communities while effectively using police resources.

Comments are closed.